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20100930
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SFGTV2 61
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 61 (some duplicates have been removed)
SFGTV2
Sep 1, 2010 11:00am PDT
'll be talking about maintaining resiliency and sustaining recovery. joining us in our panel today are pamela s. hyde, administrator, substance abuse and mental health services administration, u.s. department of health and human services, rockville, maryland; dr. a. thomas mclennan, deputy director, white house office of national drug control policy, washington, d.c.; dr. alexandre laudet, addiction and recovery scientist, new york, new york; james smallwood, founder and ceo, the choice is yours, inc., camden, new jersey. pam, how many people in the united states are in recovery? well, the estimates are about 20 million people are in recovery, working on being free of drugs and other-and alcohol. and, alexandre, what is recovery? what are some of the common paths to recovery? well, that's really two different questions. what recovery is, according to people in recovery themselves, is usually, especially for people severely addicted, it is abstinence from drugs and alcohol, as well as significantly-significant improvements in other aspects that constitute quality of life, such as employment, soc
SFGTV2
Sep 24, 2010 11:00pm PDT
it hard for people to stop using drugs and alcohol-it disrupts their lives, it disrupts their families, it disrupts their living situations, their friends. so i think some of the principles have to do with all of those things. there's many paths to recovery. so just as every human being is individual, their path to getting there is individual. there are principles about getting your life back, and that's why what alexandre said is so important-is that recovery has to do with all of those aspects of life. james, you've been there, along the path to recovery. you want to share with us some of your experiences? well, my experience has been that in-in-in the addiction itself, we're addicted to a drug, to a substance, and that the-the problem with that is that there's a problem within us that causes us to want to use a substance to hide from that-from-from, hide from the problem. and that my path was that there was a problem in me that i'd never took a look at. and so i chose to use crack, whatever it was, or other substances to-to medicate that, until i came to the point to realize that i
SFGTV2
Sep 25, 2010 1:00pm PDT
feet and 600,000 square feet. that sounds big but that only puts us in competition with a city like san diego. you have hotels in las vegas that have 1 million square feet of exhibition space. even with both of these projects. -- even with both of these projects, we are still small. these things could not only help to continue the revitalization of neighborhoods -- and those of you who remember this neighborhood 30 years ago -- things have changed quite a bit. we believe this would bring increased vitality to the neighborhood, increased spending in the city that would help overall -- the overall economy. when we look at the political will, we look at financing options and opportunities to take next that's. the best opportunity is mosconi east in 2008. that would be a perfect time live from what we believe meets the demand that is growing at the moment. the last thing i want to talk about his proposition j, the proposition to increase the hotel tax. it increases it two points, 14%. it just went up 13% two years ago, so we would have a 25% increase in hotel taxes in just a few years. it i
SFGTV2
Sep 18, 2010 1:00pm PDT
with a mixed use development, which would be a unique public-private partnership. it would be a tremendous opportunity to expand mosconi and improve the neighborhood. it would improve the entrance to the neighborhood on third street. right now, stoney is a very unattractive entry into san francisco -- mosconi is a very unattractive entry into san francisco. the other would be the north-sow 3 configuration, which would require excavating under howard street, which would have done when we first built mosconi south. it would have only cost $3 million. connect north and south and make it one large exhibit space. that would provide the total exhibition space between 500,000 square feet and 600,000 square feet. that sounds big but that only puts us in competition with a city like san diego. you have hotels in las vegas that have 1 million square feet of exhibition space. even with both of these projects. -- even with both of these projects, we are still small. these things could not only help to continue the revitalization of neighborhoods -- and those of you who remember this neighborhood 30 ye
SFGTV2
Sep 19, 2010 10:00pm PDT
and figuring out the ways they can use the packing facilities for canning the tomatoes from the local farmer and having the delivery come to the university. and if they can be doing that research on it, then sharing that is a beautiful thing. >> couple of questions, has it been difficult to spread your philosophy to urban communities and what solutions, more specifically, can you offer to help education poor communities and support those students? if money is used as the excuse and easily used in declining resources, how do we realistically break through? >> we start growing things on every available lot. >> i wasn't joking. just think of what happened during world war ii. i grew up on my parent's victory garden. they were asked to do this as a part of the war effort. they saved all of their tin cans. they kept their milk cartons. they turned out the lights. it is the way you were brought up. it is free food when you grow it. every time i see a vacant lot, i think my god, how much food can be grown. there are beautiful people doing research on ecology action with john jevens. how much food c
SFGTV2
Sep 24, 2010 3:30pm PDT
, the status of the car has changed. people are not used to having cars anymore. they sometimes use a car and go to a car sharing club or something. it is socially acceptable to cycle. 30, 40 years ago, you would maybe be seen as a loser if he came on a bicycle, -- if you came on a bicycle, but now it is for everybody. everyone is cycling. it is not, the former generation in the 60's, denmark, they could afford to buy a car and they really enjoyed it. they wanted to show it, and all trips they made or made by cars, the the new generation has a completely different view. >> i already gave my answer during my presentation. it is everything, especially if it is business or businessmen, it is money driven. show it is comparative in cost or it is less cost for business. because if you show that, there is a discussion. >> let me ask before i go to the next question, what in your experience the you believe was the most influential and excepting the different stages of the car and its role in the city? i am sure over 40 years, your attitudes toward the automobile have changed. what do you believe
SFGTV2
Sep 4, 2010 1:30pm PDT
for us. the mobility plans that local authorities are now obliged to develop, and the hearings that are organized because of that, are almost always concerning parking places. we have now a program where we are having one less car parking space. in the streets, you see, there is one car less because now bicycles can ride their bikes, but the comments are not as enthusiastic. you will have to be from the cycling movement to be happy about that. it is a hard struggle. >> you, sir? >> with health insurance, i think people are realizing it is an idea whose time has come. maybe we're trying to make the same thing with cycling. in the united states, many people, especially in big cities, are much more resistant to the idea, including individual motorists, not just businesses afraid of profit. i am wondering, i am not sure how much a european have met with people who are very resistant, thinking it is like socialism, people just want to take over the streets and will not be room for cars and we will go slower and lose jobs. have you been able to convince people? what kind of arguments
SFGTV2
Sep 6, 2010 10:30pm PDT
. in a lot of my banners, you conceal -- uc the melting pot, the imagery and myth that we use in our culture. talking about these reductions of all these different mixes of people, how you distill the experience. that is something i want to think about, collecting the ideas and ingredients, and i wanted to do the san francisco de lexie. -- elixir. we found a spring water underneath a church in cow hollow. we put rosebuds in the water to attract peace, and it made a meade. it was sitting in the gallery. we distill that through local herbs. it was really surprising how delicious it was, because we were mixing a lot of seemingly in congruent ingredients, and it was delicious and different from anything you have ever tasted. i would have been happy if it was medicinal. the idea was more important to me. but it was very good. it is something i think a lot about, especially transition history, native americans, how they have this combination of dress, from the clothing from trade companies, mixed with traditional dress. i love how reflective it is of who they are, and also the merging history's co
SFGTV2
Sep 20, 2010 10:30pm PDT
with the world premiere of three heads, six arms. the artist came from shanghai to help us celebrate the unavailing. we had a chance to speak with him about his work. >> the san francisco arts commission is pleased to be celebrating their relationship between san high and san francisco. the shanghai and san francisco. this is a 30 relationship that stretches back to win dianne feinstein was the mayor of san francisco. we premiered a new work of art here in san francisco called the three heads, six arms. welcome to san francisco. thank you for bringing your extraordinary sculpture. can you tell me about what inspired you to create this sculpture? >> this started with some trips that i took years ago. i went to to bed and i saw a lot of statues and i started to really feel the spiritual life of people in tibet. it really inspires me and i went back to shanghai and i started the creation of this. >> we see that one of the heads of the bullet it is your face. can you talk about the significance of that? -- we see that one of the heads of the buddha is your face. >> i started doing public
SFGTV2
Sep 27, 2010 10:30pm PDT
. >> thank you for watching. join us for future episodes. you can >> welcome to culturewater. in 2001, the san francisco arts commission and tampa does go public library established an arts master plan for the city soon to be renovated branch library. almost 10 years later, the san francisco arts commission has integrated a collection of vibrant new artworks by bay area artists into five new libraries, and there is more on the way. here is a closer look at some of the projects. >> the branch library improvement program is a bond funded program undertaken by the san francisco public library to upgrade each of the branch libraries throughout the neighborhoods. one of the great benefits of this opportunity is that each of these branches has a unique artwork that has been created specifically for that branch, based on input from people who live near that branch, in the surrounding neighborhood. >> trur- minded. there was a lot of community support for the project. i try to make it about the true hill and its history. they were something that natives used for making houses. the constructio
SFGTV2
Sep 5, 2010 10:00pm PDT
states just saying, hey, please help us. help us. help us make this change. >> couple of questions about private funders. has the private and foundations gravitated beyond your foundation, is this an easy sell? >> what we have to do is make these models and make them really good. that is what has happened with the schoolyard. we put a lot of money into one. we have one in new orleans. it is amazing. this has been an idea, not a berkeley or san francisco idea, something that requires a kind of special fill anthropi and what better way to buy food than people that need money in that city? so the farmer's market is helping to supply the school. now the kids are going out into the neighborhood and picking up cans and bottles and examing them, recycling them, making them into art work. it is a beautiful project. and it is a universal idea, as i say, it is not something that we dreamed up. this is the way people have been living since the beginning, buying things from local people. eating them together with the family and friends. we are just coming back to our senses. >> we have talked
SFGTV2
Sep 14, 2010 3:30pm PDT
not just pull off? >> they could just pull off. that would be useful. if we found there was not a signal, we could that can read it manually. the meter itself records. that will not change. it would cost money to get us meters modified, to take that feature off. >> what is automated is the reporting, not necessarily the meter. that is the difference, i think. >> i suspect the transmitter is somewhat water -- you know -- what is the word and looking for? >> watertight. water-resistant. >> that is it. >> colleagues, and the questions? ok, hearing and seeing none, any public comment? >> we have one speaker card. commissioner crowley: 90. -- thank you. >> i was almost asleep, but he will bring up when he said good faith effort. we have been talking for the last year-and-a-half. good faith effort does not mean jobs for my people in the community. it is not local hiring. i have heard that word for 40 years. that was when we had redevelopment time for our community, like you had in 1972 the expression of the sewage plant. that word was used. i want you all to delete that
SFGTV2
Sep 13, 2010 10:30pm PDT
connected to it. they will actually embrace it. i think it will be a good thing for all of us. >> if you are walking in the tenderloin, you'll be able to see this piece that is in front of the original [inaudible] which is a restaurant that has a lot of history. there are exciting projects on market streets. there are two gorgeous minerals as well as six different installations. they are making huge figures that they will be able to see. >> there is a definite level of appropriateness of stuff i am using. a lot of businesses died in 2009. >> i think i'm trying to deal with the maximum out of space possible. that is surging right now. everyone is doing what they can with what they have. sometimes that introduces a lot of interesting things. there is nothing that inspires quite like this. >> the project benefits both the property owner, the neighborhood, and the artists, all of whom have been effected by the economic downturn. >> this is brand new work. >> we chose artists that had a diverse array of media from home video to coulter, paintings. >> when people walk around these neighborhood
SFGTV2
Sep 29, 2010 6:00am PDT
that way, and we encourage you to join us. i just have a couple of comments. we are doing to be having a synopsis of the panels today. those are going to be available for you - there will be at each place tomorrow morning, so that will be away to start off the day so get here early so you can read that synopsis. i suggest that you enjoy the reception and have a rest full evening and come here with very clear heads because we've heard a lot today and we're going to really try to full together some action items where we can leave here tomorrow and at least come away, many of you as leaders of water utilities and those of you that advise us. hopefully we'll come up with real concrete plans on how to move forward, or at least some strategies to move forward. i know this panel has been very helpful in providing us with more ideas and thoughts on things we really need to take into account moving forward. i want to take a couple of house keeping items - . . . >> everybody still looks bright ayed today. that's a good sign. i'd like to take this moment to introduce the moderator. this is a tou
SFGTV2
Sep 1, 2010 12:00pm PDT
of shipping containers. it was important for us that we made this project for the place, of the place. what i mean by that is participants would also used repurchased materials. >> we will be speaking to one of the artists that you selected. what excited you about his idea? >> have many things. first of all, i am a fan of his architecture. because of that creativity, i knew that he could come up with something unique. i love the fact that he was specifically addressing the landscape around here, and it was also about the human interaction with this place. >> what are your expectations with the people coming to presidio habitat? >> we really hope people will come with their family, dogs, and come back a number of times the works will change over the year. the feedback we are getting is you cannot do all of them on one visit. it is really better to come back and have different experiences. >> thank you. i am with mark jensen of jensen architect. he was one of the architects to be chosen to do the presidio habitat. when you heard about this project, what inspired you about that call? >> our insp
SFGTV2
Sep 18, 2010 3:30am PDT
had gone on 60 years before i was on the planet that became stamped on us. it became our dna. >> anything that helped you get insight as to why so much of your brother's anger and passion into what you regarded as coo coo politics? >> that is an interesting question. it is hard. what i have learned is, i have written biographies, bingham family of louisville. we take a letter of a piece of evidence, there is a ah-huh, this anger daughter wrote a letter to her father. my grandfather working away in san antonio then adored this daughter, book dedicated to him. she was then gone up to new york and going to school at columbia. he wrote her a furious letter. >> your grandfather? >> yes. you have broken your promise and haven't been putting yourself full time, although the book would you say in the front of "new york times". he pulled the carpet on her. that kind of thing. you could leap on that and say, well that says it all, doesn't it? one of the things i learned about writing about family is there aren't answers to so many questions. it is a mistake in a family to think every q
SFGTV2
Sep 17, 2010 5:00am PDT
to 50 percent of us have challenged relationships that you have, you know, borderline things, 10 percent of people don't speak to their siblings at all. twelve percent are what my brother and i were. you would brace yourself to be with your, i would brace myself, my brother would start his tirades and all of these shadow issues. >> as you were hearing the stories of the people you would hear well, all of this academic and intellectual grounding for sibling relationships, then what happened? >> it was a trigger, people would say what are you working on? i would say the story about my brother and me. people would tell me about their stories. we are like minnows swimming in the well of childhood as brothers and sisters. one of the great questions for many of us is why can't we see our brother or sister as others see them? there was carl brenner, fantastic apple guy, expert on opera, he was an alpha romantic figure, flew a plane, looked like harrison ford, many lady friends, wine lover connoisseur. why did i think of him as this difficult person and why did he see me as this is his perceptio
SFGTV2
Sep 25, 2010 3:00am PDT
to be here. i want to start right in about this book, um by having you read us, this letter that your brother wrote to you when he was at the university of pennsylvania and you were the younger sister that starts right down there. remind us roughly what the year was. >> the year was 1965. the moral of this story is never have a younger sister who never throws away a piece of paper. i discovered this letter 4 or 5 months before i finished this book oh my god, a paper trail sets us straight. >> read it to us. >> only people from brooklyn uses the word geez. your letter doesn't have a single worthwhile sentence in it. i will not buy you any notebooks. i repeat no notebooks. but i will send you decals that are not to be placed in my room, around my room or on the window of my car. >> okay. who was this guy? and why did you set out to tell this story? >> this guy was my fantastic, magnet, bossy, difficult, older brother carl. he was the red state to my blue state. all you have to understand to know about how complicated and difficult this relationship was my first memory of my brother was with whe
SFGTV2
Sep 25, 2010 6:30pm PDT
about the program is the way it is set out allows us to treat the artworks that have the most need, the ones that our conservative have pointed out as the most vulnerable as opposed to ones that might be the most popular were the most miserable -- the most visible. >> it is an opportunity for the public to get involved with these art works located in their backyard and ultimately belong to them. >> i want to do something for the community, just giving back what the community has done for me. it is corny to say, but it is true. it really is what it is. that i would be able to see more pieces cleanup. >>" will check back in the future and see the fruits of conservation and revitalization efforts. if you would find out more or donate to the art carethe artsfartcommission.org. >> hello, i'm meg, welcome to "culture wire." for this episode, the director of cultural affairs, luis, will take you on a journey through presidio has been tet. -- presidio habitat. >> welcome to "culture wire." today i'm at the presidio trust, a treasure within san francisco, because the presidio trust is reall
SFGTV2
Sep 4, 2010 7:00am PDT
interesting about the exhibition. it's called if they came for us today -- am i saying it correctly? if they came for me today? which is a great, great title. that accomplishes that. because that's the key to me, how do you take an event that happened 65 years ago that was so important in terms of american history -- that's the thing, it's such a critical moment where the constitution was really tested. how do you keep it relevant in terms of its history to today and make sure that in some way it's related to cases like the aaron watata case or what happens after post-911? that to me is the tricky thing is how do you keep it alive and my hope is with the play that in some way it takes an incident, an event that happened, at least in my case it's 1948, the story that i tell, that it has relevancy to today in terms of how people can get along with each other. the most basic terms, ultimately can people from different backgrounds really get along with push comes to shove. when bottom lines are drawn, can you in fact make that bridge and get across that, quote, racial and cultural divid
SFGTV2
Sep 7, 2010 12:30am PDT
's go to public defender kenneth. ken, tell us. you are in fresno. first of all, what is it like in fresno? [laughter] and tell us about this battle that you have been going through where, you know, it almost sounds like a horror movie where they are going after you with a buzz saw and at the same time, they have used contract attorneys to try to undercut the work that your office does. >> well, the problem in fresno, it is hot. trezz know is hot of course in the -- fresno is hot of course in summertime. it is hot all the time for me. i think the problem just mentioned right now is disparity in the funding theme as opposed to the ore parties involved in the criminal -- other parties involved in the criminal justice system. most of the funding agencies for us is almost 100% from the county. while the prosecution has the benefit of grants. in fact, i believe the district attorney might have at least half of their budget is provided by grants. that is not provided to the indigent defense providers. federal grants are almost all directed toward prosecution and law enforcement. so the
SFGTV2
Sep 24, 2010 5:00am PDT
. it came completely. so many of us carry around this sibling thing in the attic thing. it came to me because something happened in our life which transformed our relationship. it was huge for me and huge for him. we learned how to become a team. and we had, my brother had a crisis and wrote me a letter about it, kind of a stunning letter that came like a time bomb, when he was quite young, barely 50 that he had a rare form of non smoker's lung cancer. it was all typed out like the fruit in a control freak way, a lawyers letter that came by fed excompletely mysterious when we had just been together at thanksgiving for 4 or 5 days. i get this manifesto, i am asking you to save my life. my life changed completely when that letter came into my life. then the great task was with how to come together, which we did. again, it was a huge experience. i never thought i would write about it. i didn't think i could bring myself to. >> yet you took notes all the way through? >> of course. i write in a journal almost everyday. i was trying to come up with a new book idea. i wanted to write about t
SFGTV2
Sep 7, 2010 2:30am PDT
familiar enough with the criminal justice system to understand what it is the way it is. most of us do not come from this business, we come from the business of making news. i think that is a very difficult question. "the wire" in and of itself is a difficult and controversial question since that program could generate a panel conversation, and i know it has and does. i think the public defender's role, just on the issue of drug crime and violence and reform, reform of the drug laws in the country -- i can only speak to the state of new york where i am. i think that is one place in which -- maybe when we talk about remaking the image of the public defender, we take it piece by piece is an issue by issue. maybe that is the issue where we start. if the task seems to great at first, in terms of resources, the case load, maybe we go issue by issue and that is the place to start, especially in the bay area and san francisco, where the public would be more receptive to reform and hearing from public defenders on a given issue. >> anyone else? with that, i want to thank all of you and associ
SFGTV2
Sep 27, 2010 7:30am PDT
city in the u.s. and over 40 million tourists visit the city every year. the 1.3 billion gallons of water required every day are delivered by a system of extraordinary scale and complex engineering. man: water is essential to the economic viability of new york city. reliable infrastructure and reliable delivery of water is a must. you have to reinvest in the infrastructure every single minute to keep it current. hurwitz: we have the stock exchange, we have the united nations -- failure can have a dramatic impact on the nation, and even internationally. so there's a really keen awareness that you always have to be fixing the system. things corrode, they rust. they get to where you turn them on and nothing happens. but it is so totally used in every nook and cranny, that making any accommodation to shut it down, to do something to it, is very difficult. narrator: two massive underground tunnels, called simply tunnel 1 and tunnel 2, provide most of the city's water supply. they run hundreds of feet below manhattan, far deeper than the subways. built at the beginning of the 20th cent
SFGTV2
Sep 26, 2010 1:00am PDT
from the court to the prosecutors, he had never seen a case that has seen more of use in his career. attorney general holder was right in terms of acting swiftly, in terms of throwing out that condition. he also stated that the department of justice's office of professional responsibility would investigate the actions of the two officers, yet a year after that, we still have heard nothing out of office regarding their conduct. the department of justice has publicly talked about how they increased training in terms of discovery obligations, and they have issued memos in terms of what they are supposed to be doing, yet they have yet to do anything regarding the behavior of those prosecutors. contrast that to the case that occurred a couple years ago, that boasts -- that of the prosecutor in north carolina, where six months after the charges were brought against the lacrosse students, and they were charged with rape, the defense attorneys uncovered evidence in the files, and north carolina is open, but they found evidence in the files showing their clients were innocent. the state atto
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 61 (some duplicates have been removed)